Arnt Gulbrandsen
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2016-08-04

Life goes on

This autumn my work shifts from arthouse pixels to mass-market pixels. An occasion to post this remarkable photo:

It reminds me a little of a more modern descendant of the sparse modernist interiors, but sparser, sparser, and with a giant screen instead of art.

The picture comes from an advertisement. You're assumed to like the interior, and you're meant to buy the TV. Too late, that model is not on sale any more.

My work involves avoiding some things you don't see on the photo: A settop box and a hundred-button remote control. Less frustration, more reliability, better usability.

2016-07-29

Morbid bindings

The first thing I learned about programming in-person (not from a book or from code) was morbid bindings, a strangely unused term.

I learned it from a university employee called Eric Monteiro, who was oddly clueful in a generally sparsely beclued environment. Can't remember his title, or what he taught.

I had just listened to Eric answer someone else about multiple inheritance, and asked a followup question, which he answered, and then he digressed into relationships in general: When two things are connected in a program, the binding is always one of three: A kind, a belonging, or else it's morbid, and morbid bindings always turn out to be bad in one way or another. He gave me a quick example: This number in this file has to be at the same as that number in that file and I think I answered, such as maximum line length in two functions that read/write the same file? (more…)

2016-07-21

Open source is succeeding, and rms is unhappy

This summer Dropbox released an image compression thing called Lepton, effectively a better way to encode JPEG (same principles, same pixel results, considerably better execution of various implementation aspects). Dropbox didn't have to do that. But one does nowadays, it's become part of modern programming culture. Using and releasing open source is a best practice, as the buzzword goes.

Around the same time Richard M. Stallman posted a condemnation of companies that both support free software and teach classes in use of nonfree software. Condemnation is the word he chooses, not my choice. No fraternisation with the enemy!

That enemy is us, now. The enemy is those who follow today's conventional best practices. A stealth-mode startup I am talking to has ten projects on github, because the CTO there has decided that whatever good programmers consider good is what shall be done in his realm. Most of the projects are forks, some with PRs for upstream, others described as the code in this fork isn't really suitable for upstream, but take it if you want. Good, polite behaviour, best practice indeed, and very different from the GNU purity that rms requires.

What is left of rms' following if the good programmers are declared to be enemies? The outlook for the GNU project is poor.

2016-07-19

It's the attitude, not the wording

Once upon a time, a clever young programmer submitted a middling patch to the linux kernel. Not directly, it went to a subsystem maintainer who merged it with other code of his own and perhaps from other people, put his name on it and sent it to Linus. The young programmer's name was not visible. That was a bit of luck, because there was a bad bug in the code, the kind of bug that causes blaming, finger-pointing and angry email.

Only Linus, that maintainer and I knew that the young programmer was myself, and Linus never said an unkind word and didn't tell anyone who wrote the code either, so noone could email me and tell me their thoughts.

Fast forward twenty years, to when Sarah Sharp decided to stop contributing to the linux kernel. Sarah wrote good code for the kernel. I was sad to hear that she left, sadder about the reasons.

A lot of people blame Linus and his swearing for her leaving. I think that's unfair to Sarah, unfair to Linus, and worst of all, I think that we in the open source community hurt our community when we do that. Even if Linus' swearing hurt Sarah.

Linus has his faults. For example. when someone from Redhat wanted kdbus into the kernel, Linus' response showed good technical judgement, but it was also heated, loud and negative. Certainly not ideal. However, the fair comparison is not against an ideal. Linus' response ought to be compared to a standard professional response, plausibly something like oh, this code is poor, on the other hand that major stakeholder wants it merged. After a few rounds of squabbling and some cleanup the code is accepted.

That would be professional behaviour. That sort of professionalism is how a good, clueful CTO ends up with 22,000 messy lines of PHP despite a clear mandate from the board to prioritise quality. How teams end up selecting MongoDB over PostgreSQL. Possibly that's how Windows NT got graphics drivers in the kernel.

Linus won't tolerate that sort of professionalism, instead he'll swear and scream. Is that worse? I think not. It may or may not be better, but it's not worse. But because Linus behaves that way and attracts criticism for his loud swearing, some of the less notable opensource contributors escape criticism, and some of them are mean and spiteful as well as loud.

Saying fuck isn't that bad. In my opinion it's about as bad as being late for a meeting. A mean attitude is worse, much worse.

Since people focus on Linus' swearing, though, Linus' swearing opens the door to meanness and spite. A minor fault enables a major.

2016-07-18

Animated art

People have started making art using animations on the internet, mostly on tumblr. Great. Most of what I've seen is abstract, some not. All of it is art in a new domain and such a joy. Some examples I like (note that the last one of these probably shows a nude): 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. Several of these are by Florian de Looij, who also makes interesting inanimate art. (Neat word!)

2016-06-20

The value of features

A programmer doesn't always know whether a new feature of a program will turn out to be valuable or not. Perhaps: doesn't even often know. I've just had a repeat lesson on that topic.

I have a new phone. The manufacturer brags about a high-resolution camera and many other things, but I bought it because it's the smallest phone with a good screen and an up-to-date version of Android. (Yes it fits in a pocket, even sideways in some pockets.) I noticed in a review on the web that the phone's watertight, complete with an underwater photo of a beauty in bikini, but didn't give any thought to it. After all I don't spend much time in pools or at beaches, and if I do the bikini beauties don't gravitate towards me. When I bought the phone I had no idea that I would care about its being waterproof.

But I do care. The summer rains here in Munich can be impressively intense. Until now I've always been conscious that I was exposing an expensive and fragile electronic device to water when I used a phone in the rain. I have done that when I needed to, but in a corner of my mind I was always aware of the risk. Now I just do whatever I need to do, rain or shine, and don't worry about the device.

2016-01-14

Nexus Player

Our latest little film-playing box is a Nexus Player. It's good.

We have it connected to an Epson 1920×1080 projector and a Musical Fidelity amplifier.

The most remarkable features of the Nexus Player are that its remote control is simple and does not require line of sight, and that as of Android 6.0.1 it supports USB audio. (more…)

2016-01-01

A cognac apéritif

Yesterday at this time I couldn't remember either name or recipe of the apéritif I wanted to make, I only remembered I got it from some cognac promotion site many years ago. Today I remember everything (and the site still exists), but it's a little late now.

Its name is Hold-up, and it is prepared thusly: Two parts cognac (VS, nothing fancy), one part triple sec, one part lemon juice, one part sugar syrup. Mix, leave to stand for a few hours, pour over ice cubes and serve.